Assessment

It is important to build on students’ prior learning.  To do this effectively we need to understand what students already know and what they need to do to develop their knowledge and understanding even further, we do this through assessment.

We realise the importance of communicating frequently and clearly with families; you will receive a progress report or attend a progress meeting each term.

Key Stage 3 (KS3)

At The Wren we use a system that allows us to monitor the progress of students of all abilities so that everyone can achieve their full potential.

Our assessment system at KS3 is centred around our progressive curriculum, with teachers assessing how well students are meeting the expectations of the curriculum. Using KS2 SATs, Cognitive Abilities Tests (CATs) and National Group Reading Tests (NGRTs), we allocate ‘Expected Progress’ grades for each student. These ‘Expected Progress’ grades remain the same because the curriculum demands increase as students move through KS3. The NGRT is repeated at the end of Year 7 and end of Year 8.

At KS3, frequent, low stakes assessment and feedback take place in the classroom with interactions between staff and students, with feedback on work or through questioning.   This provides important and regular feedback to our students to help them understand how to improve and what they have done well. You will see students’ responses to feedback in their books in purple pen.

Alongside Current Progress grades, we communicate how well students are engaging with our school values of Kindness, Ambition and Respect.

KS3 Autumn Term Spring Term Summer Term
Year 7 Report 1 (Values, CATs, reading results) Progress Evening Report 2 (Values and progress)
Year 8 Report 1 (Values and progress) Report 2 (Values and progress) Progress Evening
Year 9 Progress Evening Report 1 (Values and progress) Report 2 (Values and progress)

 

Key Stage 4 (KS4)

At KS4, we identify Minimum Expected Outcomes (MEOs) for each student and subject so that we can all work to help them achieve the best possible GCSE results.

Assessment of students’ progress at KS4 is frequent and varied in class and feedback is provided to students through a variety of means.  We recognise that at Key Stage 4 students need to be prepared for the expectations and conditions of formal examinations and so we run ’Mock Exams’ in both Years 10 and 11.t These more formal examinations also allow teachers to make more informed predictions about students’ Most Likely Outcomes (MLOs) by the end of Year 11.

Reports at KS4 continue to include grades showing how well students are engaging with our school values of Kindness, Ambition and Respect. These grades are taken into consideration when planning for interventions for those students who need additional support to achieve their Minimum Expected Outcomes (MEOs).

Some subjects also have Non-Exam Assessment components, which are any assessed components that are not a written examination and take the form of portfolios, coursework, controlled assessments or speaking and listening exams. Please see NEAs for details of expectations and deadlines. Most Likely Outcomes (MLOs) take achievement or likely achievement of NEAs into consideration too.

KS4 Autumn Term Spring Term Summer Term
Year 10 Settling Report 1 (Values only)

Report 2 (Values and MLOs)

Progress Meeting

Report 3 (Values, mocks and MLOs)
Year 11 Report 1 (Values, mocks and MLOs)

Progress Meeting

Report 2 (Values and MLOs)

External Exams

 

Key Stage 5 (KS5 – Wren Six)

When students join Wren Six, we use students’ GCSEs (or equivalents) to set aspirational targets which we continue to call Minimum Expected Outcomes (MEOs) at KS5. For International students we use the UCAS International qualifications document to set MEOs.

At KS4, we continue to use a varied range of assessment and feedback strategies to ensure students are able to improve and achieve their potential. We also run mock series in both Year 12 and Year 13. As shown in the table below, we regularly report progress home and, alike at KS4, we continue to use classwork, independent work, and mock exams to predict students’ Most Likely Outcomes (MLOs).

Reports at KS5 continue to include grades showing how well students are engaging with our school values of Kindness, Ambition and Respect. These grades are taken into consideration when planning for interventions for students  who need additional support to achieve their Minimum Expected Outcomes (MEOs).

Some A-levels and BTECs also have Non-Exam Assessment components, which are any assessed components that are not a written examination and take the form of portfolios, coursework, controlled assessments or speaking and listening exams. Please see NEAs for details of expectations and deadlines. Most Likely Outcomes (MLOs) take achievement or likely achievement of NEAs into consideration too.

KS5 Autumn Term Spring Term Summer Term
Year 12 Settling Report 1 (Values only)

Report 2 (Values and MLOs)

Progress Meeting

Mock exams

Report 3 (Values, mocks and MLOs)

Year 13

Mock exams

Report 1 (Values, mocks and MLOs)

Progress Meeting

Report 2 (Values and MLOs)

External Exams
Category Be respectful and kind Be ambitious
Exceptional (E)

·         Always polite, kind and helpful to others.

·         Contributes positively to the learning environment.

·         Respects the environment around them including resources.

·         Respects others’ values, opinions and beliefs.

·         Always follows staff instructions.

·         Their effort is consistently above and beyond.

·         Starts tasks quickly and independently.

·         Always engages proactively on feedback.

·         Consistently does homework to a good or exceptional standard.

·         Always punctual.

·         Reliably brings in the key equipment items.

Good (G)

·         Polite and kind to others.

·         Respects others’ values, opinions and beliefs.

·         Respects the environment around them including resources.

·         Always follows staff instructions.

·         Starts most tasks independently.

·         Engages with feedback.

·         This student does their homework and to a good standard.

·         Reliably brings in the key equipment items.

·         Punctual.

Requires Improvement (RI)

·         Usually polite and kind to others.

·         Will tidy up after themselves but might need a prompt.

·         Sometimes needs to be reminded to respect others’ values, opinions and beliefs.

·         Sometimes does not follow staff instructions first time.

·         Requires regular teacher reminders to start a task.

·         Needs encouragement to engage with feedback.

·         Sometimes does homework, but to an unacceptable standard.

·         Brings equipment to lessons but may forget on occasion.

·         Usually on time.

Cause for Concern (CC)

·         Often not polite or kind to their peers or staff.

·         Does not respect the environment around them.

·         Rarely follow staff instructions first time.

·         Requires a lot of prompting to make the right decisions.

·         Their effort is detrimental to their achievement.

·         Only occasionally, or very rarely, contributes positively to the learning environment.

·         This student rarely, if ever, completes homework.

·         Does not, or rarely, brings the correct equipment.

·         Often late to lesson.

 

The National Group Reading Test (NGRT)

  •   NGRT is the reading test all students at The Wren take three times at the beginning of Key Stage 3; at the beginning of Year 7, end of Year 7 and end of Year 8.
  • The test is not timed but takes around 30 minutes on average.
  • Students complete the teston a computer in silent, calm conditions.
  • The test is adaptive, responding to a student’s ability as they complete it ensuring all students are challenged.
  • The test provides us with a Standard Age Score (SAS), a reading age, Key Stage 2 or GCSE indicators, and progress measures.
  • Results are standardised on over 11,700 pupils with its national benchmarks verified each year based on data from half a million students.
  • These results are widely used in Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) reading intervention projects.

What is the benefit of adaptive testing?

Adaptive testing means that NGRT can be used for students of all abilities. The digital test presents questions based on previous answers, to respond to each child’s reading ability, so that more able students can be stretched, without making the process intimidating for those who might struggle with higher demand questions. Customised implications for teaching and learning in each individual report offer practical help with next steps in the classroom.

Which results are shared with families?

The test provides teachers with a Standardised Age Score (SAS); the SAS is based on the student’s raw score which has been adjusted for both age and the difficulty of the test taken and placed on a scale that makes a comparison with a nationally representative sample of students of the same age across the UK. The average score is 100.

We share the National Percentile Rank (NPR) with families on students’ progress reports.  The NPR relates to the SAS and indicates the percentage of students obtaining any particular score. NPR of 50 is average. NPR of 5 means that the student’s score is within the lowest 5% of the national sample; NPR of 95 means that the student’s score is within the highest 5% of the national sample.

What happens when the tests show that students weaker reading scores?

English teachers take all students to the library during a regular timetabled slot; during this time students are assisted to select and read books that are suitable for their reading proficiency. Teachers will read one-to-one or in small groups with those students whose reading scores require improvement.

For students who have very low reading scores, additional reading interventions are put into place and more frequent testing allows us to monitor the progress a student is making. Interventions are varied but include things like paired reading with an older student and one to one phonics work with a specialised teacher.

The Cognitive Abilities Test Fourth Edition (CAT4) is an assessment which identifies how well a student can think about tasks and solve problems using a range of different questions. Some tasks involve thinking about shapes and patterns (Non-verbal Reasoning), some with words (Verbal Reasoning) or numbers (Quantitative Reasoning) and, finally, some questions are answered by thinking about shape and space together and imagining a shape being changed and moving (Spatial Ability).

CAT4, unlike an English or Maths test, is not a test of what the student has learnt. It tests how an individual can think in areas that are known to make a difference to learning and achievement.

What do the different scores mean?

We use the SAS (Standardised Age Score). This gives a score to compare the results of students who were born in the same year and calendar month. Students who score exactly as expected for their age group would be given a score of 100 (scores between 89 – 111 are considered to be within the “average” bracket).

There are four tests:

Verbal reasoning – “thinking with words.” This is linked to concepts framed in words: it may involve working out how words in a group are related or the relationships between words. This result is often used as a baseline of a child’s potential in essay-writing subjects like English and History.

Non-verbal reasoning – “thinking with shapes”. This does not involve reading but measures a child’s ability to solve problems using shapes or patterns and is most similar to a typical IQ test.

Quantitative reasoning – “thinking with numbers”. This is the numerical equivalent of verbal reasoning and involves working out the relationship between numbers in a sequence. This result is helpful when considering progress in Maths.

Spatial ability – “thinking with shapes and space”. This involves the manipulation of shapes to demonstrate an understanding of the spatial relationship between images and is often linked to ability in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) subjects.

Reviews of marking – centre assessed marks (GCE coursework, GCE and GCSE non-examination assessments, Project qualifications) 2023-24

The Wren School is committed to ensuring that whenever its staff mark candidates’ work this is done fairly, consistently and in accordance with the awarding body’s specification and subject-specific associated documents.

Candidates’ work will be marked by staff who have appropriate knowledge, understanding and skill, and who have been trained in this activity. The Wren School is committed to ensuring that work produced by candidates is authenticated in line with the requirements of the awarding body. Where more than one subject teacher/tutor is involved in marking candidates’ work, internal moderation and standardisation will ensure consistency of marking.

Students will be informed of centre assessed marks following internal moderation. At this point they may request a review of these marks and to access materials to assist them in reviewing the centre’s marking of their assessment. These materials may be original worked to be viewed under supervision or copies of original material and will normally be provided to the student within two working days.

At this point, students will have five working days to review these materials and submit a request of the centre’s marking to the Examinations Officer using the form attached. Requests will not be accepted after this deadline.

The dates for release of marks and appeals are detailed below. Click here to access the Appeal Request Form.

Appeal deadlines

KS4/5 External non-exam assessment deadlines 23/24

Subject Component Qualification Wren deadline for FINAL work to be submitted Appeals window opens: Appeals window opens:
PE Coursework GCSE 23-Feb-24 11-Mar-24 15-Mar-24
PE Practical GCSE 23-Feb-24 11-Mar-24 15-Mar-24
Drama Component 2: Devising NEA GCSE 15-Mar-24 15-Apr-24 19-Apr-24
English Language Spoken Lang Recording GCSE 15-Mar-24 15-Apr-24 19-Apr-24
Music Component 2 (Composition ) GCSE 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Film Coursework A-level 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
EPQ Coursework 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
English Lit NEA A-level 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Science CPAC A-level 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Geography NEA A-level 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Travel and Tourism Units 3 and 9 BTEC 12/13 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Health and social care Unit 1 and Unit 10 A-level 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Health and social care Unit 17 A-level 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Health and social care R033 Supporting individuals through life events BTEC 11 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Health and social care R035 Health Promotion Campaigns BTEC 11 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
History NEA A-level 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Food, Nutrition Unit 4 A-level 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Computing Unit 7 and 15 BTEC 12/13 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Hospitality & Catering NEA GCSE 28-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
IT RO70 – course work GCSE 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Functional Skills English Speaking and listening FS 11 22-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Design & Tech NEA GCSE 29-Mar-24 15-Apr-24 19-Apr-24
Design & Tech NEA A-level 29-Mar-24 22-Apr-24 26-Apr-24
Photography Exam GCSE 22-Apr-24 15-May-24 22-May-24
Photography Exam A-level 24-Apr-24 15-May-24 22-May-24
Art Exam GCSE 29-Apr-24 15-May-24 22-May-24
Art Coursework A-level 01-May-24 15-May-24 22-May-24
Textiles Coursework A-level 01-May-24 15-May-24 22-May-24
Photography Coursework A-level 01-May-24 15-May-24 22-May-24
Art Textiles Coursework GCSE 01-May-24 15-May-24 22-May-24
Art Coursework GCSE 01-May-24 15-May-24 22-May-24
Graphics Coursework GCSE 01-May-24 15-May-24 22-May-24
Photography Coursework GCSE 01-May-24 15-May-24 22-May-24
Art Exam A-level 02-May-24 15-May-24 22-May-24
Art Textiles Exam GCSE 02-May-24 15-May-24 22-May-24
Graphics Exam GCSE 07-May-24 15-May-24 22-May-24
Textiles Exam A-level 08-May-24 15-May-24 22-May-24

 

Information for candidates Privacy Notice.doc